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Cosmetic Dentistry Myths and Facts

Cosmetic Dentistry Myths and Facts

bright smiles dentistIf you lack confidence in your smile, you are not alone. There are hundreds of thousands of people who aren’t confident in their smiles. Discoloration, misaligned teeth, or missing teeth are some of the biggest culprits for this lack of confidence. Cosmetic dentistry can help these individuals regain their confidence and it has advanced quite a bit in the past few decades. However, most of the people who suffer from discoloration, misaligned teeth, etc., still hesitate when it comes to cosmetic dentistry due to the misconception about what cosmetic dentistry is. In fact, several myths about cosmetic dentistry have made their way across the country. We are going to take the most common myths and find the truth behind the misconceptions.

Myth: Cosmetic Dentistry is Too Expensive.

Due to advancements in cosmetic dentistry procedures, treatments have become more affordable. There are options for patients when it comes to the methods and materials that are used when they undergo cosmetic dentistry. Additionally, most modern dental practices will work with their patients to ensure that cosmetic dentistry is more affordable; payment options and financing allow patients to pay for cosmetic dentistry over time. Keep in mind that the money you spend on cosmetic dentistry today can save you hundreds if not thousands of dollars down the road.

Myth: Cosmetic Dentistry Damages Your Teeth

Nothing could be further from the truth! Cosmetic dentistry often preserves your teeth’s natural structure and can often increase the lifespan of your teeth!

Myth: Cosmetic Dentistry Looks Fake.

When you hear the words “cosmetic dentistry” you might get images of blindingly white, tic-tac like veneers or ill-fitting dentures. However, cosmetic dentistry has improved quite exponentially over the past few decades. Treatments can now be highly customized, allowing you to have a natural feeling and looking smile.

Myth: Cosmetic Dentistry Isn’t Necessary

Cosmetic dentistry is not a luxury reserved for the wealthy and is about much more than aesthetics. Cosmetic dental procedures restore and preserve your teeth, promoting good oral health. It promotes longevity and helps prevent further dental health issues, like tooth loss or periodontal disease.

Myth: Cosmetic Dentistry is Painful

Thousands of people suffer from dental anxiety and in many cases, dental phobia comes from a fear of pain. Modern dentists take extra precautions to ensure that their patients are as comfortable as possible during any dental procedure, including cosmetic dental procedures. If you have dental anxiety speak with your local dentist. Your dentist can create a plan that can ease your anxiety and provide you additional comfort.

Cosmetic Dentistry Myths are Persistent

 People tend to have misconceptions about cosmetic dentistry because it is easier to write something off if you don’t understand it, and it is even easier to write it off if you don’t see the long-term benefits.

Cosmetic dentistry is more than just a superficial procedure, it can boost your self-esteem and resolve serious dental problems, and is often more affordable than you might realize.

If you are tired of lacking confidence in your smile allow Dr. Hatch in Pocatello. Our staff can answer all of your questions and provide guidance in how you can alleviate your concerns about cosmetic dentistry.

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How to Choose a Family Dentist in Blackfoot

Choosing a good family dentist is not always easy. Your dental health is an important part of your overall health, and you need to see someone who is experienced, stays up-to-date on new techniques or procedures, and who is convenient for you to visit in Blackfoot. Cost and insurance coverage are also deciding factors. Take the time to do a little research, learn about the dentists in your area, and select someone who will meet your needs. The office of Dr. Dennis Hatch is happy to help answers questions you may have. Here are a few things to consider when selecting a family dentist in Blackfoot.

family dentist BlackfootConsider Costs

The first place many people look when choosing a new dentist is a list of providers covered by their dental insurance. Make sure you understand your dental coverage, and verify with the dentist’s office that they do accept your insurance plan.
Ask about accepted payments and if payment plans are available. Costs for certain procedures can vary greatly between different practices in the same community. You may want to get an estimate of out-of-pocket costs for common procedures like a filling or root canal.
Some dentists will offer a discount if payment is made at the time of service, so be sure to ask about any additional ways to lower your costs. If you do not have insurance, you may still qualify for a dental discount plan or a payment plan.

Location and Office Hours

It’s important to choose a dentist whose office is close to your home or work and who is available at times that are convenient for you. It is not uncommon for dentists to have several offices to serve a wider area, so be sure to confirm their hours of operation before scheduling an appointment.
Be sure to inquire about emergency care and whether the dentist is available outside of regular office hours to treat emergencies. You’ll also want to know if they offer most major dental procedures, or if you would be referred to another office for more serious procedures.

 Experience and Qualifications

Dental offices should be forthcoming when answering questions pertaining to the dentist’s training and experience. Find out where they obtained their education and how long they have been practicing. Also check to see if they belong to any trade associations, and if they receive continuing education.
Use your own judgment when evaluating the experience and education of a dentist for your family. Consider your own personal preferences and decide if you’d rather see someone with years of experience and who has an established practice in your community or someone who has less experience but more recent education.
You can also check with your state licensing board to verify that the dentist is licensed to practice in your state and whether any disciplinary actions have been made against them.

 Ask Friends and Family for Referrals

Asking your friends, family or coworkers about their dentist can provide valuable insight that can help you make your decision. Ask them what they like about their dentist, how they started seeing him or her, and if they’ve ever had any problems with scheduling, visits or billing.

Of all the research you can do, getting an honest opinion from someone you trust is often the most insightful. Many times your friends or family will have had experiences with other dentists as well, so be sure to ask if you have someone in mind.

Making the Final Decision

As you can see, several factors should be considered when deciding which dentist you should see. Rank your priorities and try to focus on the items that are the most important to you personally. Find a dentist that you like and can trust, and that you can openly discuss any concerns you may have about your dental health.

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Keeping Your Child’s Mouth Healthy

Family Dentist Blackfoot | Dr. Hatch Tooth decay is the most common chronic childhood disease, so it’s important to teach your child early about the importance of maintaining good oral health, especially during candy-focused holidays like Halloween, the winter holidays, Valentine’s Day and Easter. Not only does untreated tooth decay cause pain, it may also lead to infections that affect eating, speaking, and overall wellbeing. Fortunately, tooth decay and other oral diseases are preventable. Hatch Dental in Blackfoot is a general family dentist who is happy to answer questions about all your dental needs.

Proper Care

• Bring your child to his or her dentist for regular checkups.
• Protect your child’s teeth with fluoride.
• Talk to your dentist about dental sealants. Sealants protect teeth from decay and have the potential to nearly eliminate tooth decay in school-age children when used in combination with fluoride.

Teach Your Children These To-Do’s

• Make taking care of teeth fun! Let your child pick out their own toothbrush or perhaps make teeth brushing a family affair. It’s always fun to brush the tongue!• Brush teeth 2 times each day for 2 minutes
• Use a pea-sized dab of fluoride toothpaste
• Spit and don’t swallow
• Angle toothbrush against gums
• Brush back and forth, gently, in short strokes
• Brush the front, back, and top of teeth
• Brush tongue to remove germs and freshen breath
• Have your child floss daily to remove plaque from between the teeth and under the gum line, before it can harden into tartar.

Kids will generally need help with brushing until age six or seven. Beginning around age 4, begin flossing for your child. By the time they reach age 8, most kids can begin flossing for themselves.

A Few Facts

• Kids should use a soft toothbrush with a shape that will allow them to reach all areas of their mouth.
• Plaque is a sticky film of germs that forms on teeth and gums after eating. Plaque that’s not removed by brushing twice a day and flossing once a day can lead to cavities.
• Taking good care of your own teeth sends a message that oral health is something to be valued.
• A balanced diet is necessary for your child to develop strong, decay-resistant teeth.
• Discourage frequent snacking between meals, especially sugary foods. The sugars and starches found in many foods and snacks like cookies, candy, and soft drinks attack the tooth enamel and may lead to cavities.

Call Hatch Dental in Blackfoot to schedule an appointment today.

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How to Prevent Tooth Decay and Cavities

family dentist blackfootTooth decay is incredibly common, but largely preventable through good oral hygiene. Changes to diet, regular visits to your dentist, and brushing and flossing regularly can prevent tooth decay and cavities. But what causes tooth decay to begin with, and what changes may be necessary to prevent further decay?

What is Tooth Decay?

Our teeth are made up of minerals, and tooth decay occurs when plaque builds up and acids in our saliva attack the hard surfaces of our teeth, resulting in mineral loss. The foods we eat and beverages we consume largely affects the acid levels in our mouth, as does the time of day we are consuming these items.

The acid is produced by a reaction between the sugars we consume and bacteria in our mouths from plaque. Sugary foods and those with a lot of carbohydrates can cause tooth decay, as can foods that tend to stick in our teeth. Limit your intake of foods or beverages with a lot of sugar, and avoid eating these types of snacks in-between meals. Over time, the acid produced by the bacteria reduces the strength of the enamel and can result in tooth decay or a cavity.

Does My Overall Health Affect Tooth Decay?

Each person is distinctively different and factors such as existing medical conditions, medications, family history and oral health history can all impact your risk of tooth decay and cavities. Talk with your dentist about your medical history and discuss ways to prevent additional tooth decay.

It is important to point out that regardless of your family history or your additional risk factors, tooth decay is preventable with the appropriate care. Flouride treatments and dental sealants both provide a barrier of protection against acids and bacteria causing tooth decay. Those with a family history or personal history may need to be extra diligent to effectively combat tooth decay.

Oral Hygiene Habits to Prevent Tooth Decay

Good oral hygiene can help prevent tooth decay. Brush twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste. Brushing helps control plaque, and reduces the bad bacteria in your mouth. You should also clean in between teeth using floss or a type of interdental cleaner daily to remove plaque and any food that may be stuck between your teeth. You may also use a fluoride rinse after brushing.

See your dentist regularly for cleanings and exams. If you have problems with tooth decay, you may want to discuss fluoride treatments or dental sealants with your dentist.

Just as important as good oral hygiene, eating a nutritious and well-balanced diet can play a huge rule in preventing tooth decay. Avoid snacking on sugary or sticky foods, as these can promote the bacteria that cause tooth decay. Some foods containing carbohydrates like breads and cereals may not seem harmful, but they typically contain sugars and also promote acidity. Eating these items with other food items as part of a meal can counter the acidic reaction and lessen the potential damage.

Reducing Tooth Decay Through Daily Practices

It is possible to reduce tooth decay and to prevent cavities by making small changes in our daily routines. Make brushing and flossing a priority everyday. Avoid drinking sodas or sweetened beverages, and swap out sugary snacks for more healthy options.

If you have problems with tooth decay, your dentist can be your best resource for identifying things you can do to lower your risk of developing cavities. Talk to your dentist about your family history, and share any concerns you may have about tooth decay, plaque and cavities. If you are looking for a dentist in the Blackfoot. Call Dr. Dennis Hatch to schedule an appointment in Blackfoot. 

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Rebuilding Tooth Enamel

Family Dentist Blackfoot | Dr. Dennis Hatch If you experience tooth sensitivity and/or eat a lot of sugar and simple carbohydrates, you may want to consider using tooth products that help reduce (or even reverse) early decay by virtue of a process called “remineralization.”
This involves delivering extra doses of calcium and phosphate to replace minerals lost in the ongoing battle against bacteria and acids. To maintain the mineral building blocks that are essential to tooth strength, saliva containing calcium and phosphate helps replenish minerals dissolved by acidic plaque or food.
This balance may be upset when more minerals are lost than gained and teeth become vulnerable to decay. While fluoride greatly helps saliva’s natural remineralization, toothpastes that deliver calcium phosphate may speed up the process.

If you have questions about tooth sensitivity, or any other dental concerns, we invite you to call us. At the DENTAL OFFICE OF DR. DENNIS HATCH, we provide quality, personal dental care in a comfortable, immaculate and professional environment at 790 N. Meridian Street.
From preventive and routine core ,to elective cosmetic procedures, our staff will make you feel comfortable during your visit. Our emphasis is on prevention. Preventing dental disease is less costly and more rewarding than correcting problems after they occur. Let us help you bring out that natural smile.

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Blackfoot Dentist and Tips to Prevent Tooth Decay

Preventing Tooth Decay from Acidic and Sugary Foods

It’s no secret that the things we put in our mouth have a direct impact on the health of our teeth and gums. The acidity or sugar levels of some foods and drinks may speed up tooth decay, so it’s important to know just what you are consuming and what it’s doing to your teeth.

The science is pretty simple—your mouth naturally has a neutral pH. When we consume acidic foods or drinks, it affects the pH level and speeds up tooth decay. Sugary foods create bacteria in your mouth that also lead to tooth decay.

There are a few tips—and a few foods and drinks to avoid—that can help prevent tooth decay caused by acidic or sweet foods.

Limit Acidic or Sugary Foods and Drinks to Prevent Tooth Decay

Soda is the first thing that comes to mind when people think about foods or drinks that damage their teeth—and they’re right. Not only is soda acidic, but it is also filled with sugars that will cause bacteria that break down the enamel on your teeth.

Alcoholic drinks as well as citrus fruits or juices are also acidic. Swap for a less acidic beverage, or use a straw to limit contact with your teeth. Keep an eye out for acidic especially if they are vinegar or tomato based.

 If You Must, Consume Acidic Foods with Other Foods

Generally speaking, you can reduce the level of acid in your mouth by consuming acidic foods or drinks as part of a meal. The additional foods will neutralize or wash away the acid and can reduce damage to your teeth.

Some foods also have preventative qualities that make them ideal for eating with acidic or sweet foods. Crunchy foods like apples or carrots can help remove plaque from your teeth. Dairy foods and items high in calcium can also help protect your teeth.

If you must snack during the day, avoid foods with sugar, and this includes crackers and most breads, which actually have high levels of sugar. Check the labels, and choose healthy snacks to prevent tooth decay.

Brush your teeth regularly, floss every day, and use a fluoride mouth rinse after brushing to reduce plaque and to promote enamel. Good dental hygiene is the number one defense for preventing tooth decay and gum disease.

See Your Dentist for Regular Check-Ups

Your dentist will be able to tell you if you are experiencing tooth decay and can offer additional guidance for prevention. Regular check-ups ensure that potential problems can be addressed sooner, preventing prolonged tooth decay that can cause cavities.

Many people feel that visiting the dentist on a regular basis for prevention is cost prohibitive, and may postpone a visit until they can no longer tolerate the pain. Most tooth problems do not get better on their own, and the sooner you address the problem the less pain you will have and the easier it will be on your pocketbook.

Also keep in mind that if the cavity or other problem is a result of consuming acidic foods or bacteria caused by sugary foods, your other teeth may be decaying if you don’t make a change.

Know What You Consume and How it Impacts Your Health

The main point to takeaway is that the old saying is true—we are what we eat. Take the time to read the labels on the products you consume on a regular basis and you will be surprised to learn just how much sugar is in the foods you eat every day.

Limit acidic foods and avoid eating acidic or sugary foods as snacks. Drinking lots of water will help wash away some of the acid and sugar, but not all. Be sure to take care of your teeth brushing and flossing everyday, and you will have an advantage over most when it comes to tooth decay.

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Basic Types of Dental Practices in Blackfoot

Here is a look at the basic types of dental practices. Dr. Dennis Hatch, DDS can take care of your families basic dental needs and works with some of the best specialists in the area for patients needing more specialized services. The dental practice of Dr. Hatch in Blackfoot, Idaho serves patients of all ages and needs.

Basic Types of Dental Practices

1) Fine Dentistry and Prevention

This type of dentistry is dedicated to achieving Optimum Health and Optimum Repair of the oral health system. A thorough examination is completed and goal setting is instituted to create a Master Plan that focuses on maximum protection and preservation of the oral health complex. Crucial to the continuation of Optimum health care good daily oral hygiene habits and a strict regiment of professional examinations and hygiene visits to prevent decay and gum disease.

 2) Maintenance Dentistry

Drilling of toothThe quality of care is good and preventive measures are fairly effective, but the patient is not dedicated to achieving Optimum health. Optimum health of the natural teeth has as its goal the restoration of teeth to ideal beauty, function, comfort and longevity. Usually maintenance dentistry is intermediate dentistry such as silver and plastic fillings, which last 3-5-years. Maintenance dentistry is removable partial dentures rather than fixed or stationary bridgework.

3) Repair Oriented Dental Practice

No long term thought is given to either prevention of decay, gum disease or bite (occlusion-related) problems. The interesting thing about patients who go to this kind of practice is that they don’t like it, but may have given up on dentistry and what it can do for them.

 4) Emergency Dental Practice

Patients are seen only for emergency treatment. The majority of patients in this type of practice lost their teeth between the ages of 35-50.

Dr. Dennis Hatch’s  Dental Practice in Blackfoot, Idaho

Please note that Dr. Hatch makes every effort to maintain a type 1 and 2 dental practice. We have absolutely no interest in being either a “drill, fill and bill” practice, or an emergency only practice.

In order for us to enjoy our practice and our lives we believe we must be providing a worthwhile service for people we value and respect.

                We believe in establishing long-term relationships built on freedom of choice and mutual respect and value for each other

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